Not only is this a very effective cleaner for your kitchen or bathroom, it is also all natural, free of any chemicals and non-toxic. It's an excellent way to reuse lemon or other citrus peels, and is rock bottom inexpensive. Easy, cheap and sustainable!

lemonvinegar

Make this easy, natural, non-toxic multi-purpose kitchen cleaner with lemon peels and white vinegar.

Sustainable Food | Reuse and Compost | Non Toxic Kitchen

Keep a glass jar filled with white vinegar in your kitchen cupboard or on the counter, and throw your lemon peels in it.  Make sure to keep the lid on tightly.  As the lemon peels steep, they release their oils into the brew. Top up with more vinegar as needed (you want to make sure the peels are completely submerged).  You can add more peels as you have them.

This makes a powerful cleaner for glass, countertops and cleaning the inside of the fridge.  You can add some to a bucket of hot water, along with a squirt of dishwashing liquid and use it for moping the kitchen floor.

Use the yellow zest part of the peel, not the white pith.  If you put lemons through your juicer, you’ll likely be peeling them with a vegetable peeler first. This is a great way to use the peels. If you don’t use a juicer and find you don’t have any occasion to peel your lemons, you can always just peel the zest off with a vegetable peeler before you cut and use your lemons for cooking or making salad dressings.


Kitchen Counter Compost

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